Friday, 4 May 2012

What Motivates Your Food Choices?

If you were to approach someone on the street eating an apple and ask they why they chose that apple what do you think their response would be? Other than the obvious odd look of course.....

1. I like apples (taste)
2. It was the easiest thing to grab on the way out the door (convenience)
3. It was on sale (economy)
4. I have to fit into a size 4 bridesmaid dress this weekend and am dieting (physical appearance)
5. It is good for me (health)
6. I heard it will make me smarter (myths and beliefs)
7. We always ate apples in the mornings growing up (culture)
8. I saw someone eating an apple on TV this morning and I had a craving (not sure what to call this, external influence?)
9. I was sad and it makes me feel better (emotional eating)

Do you know what motivates your food choices? There are many variables that influence our food choices and I'm sure I haven't covered them all.

One thing I have learned over the years is that number one, taste, is non-negotiable. If it doesn't taste good it won't be eaten more than once. That being said taste preferences can adapt over time with gradual changes. Here in North America we are adapted to a diet high in sugar, fat and salt, all of which are shortcuts to tastiness. Unfortunately an excess of refined sugar, bad fats and salt are bad for our health. One of my main goals with my family journey to health is to re-educate our taste preferences back to the basics of whole foods, herbs, spices, and healthy fats. First up is Sneaky Salt Saturday, discovering and reducing excessive sodium.

3 comments:

  1. I've been thinking about the emotion behind our food choices a lot lately. I'm exploring going wheat-free (at least reducing it substantially) and am finding that I feel sad thinking of not baking pies, not using old family memories, not enjoying making sourdough bread with my dad. It's not that I will miss the foods themselves, just the social and cultural connection. Does this make sense?


    Pattie Perkins

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    Replies
    1. Hi Pattie! Thanks for the comment. That makes perfect sense. There is a reason the term comfort food exists and is different for all of us based on our culture and experiences growing up. Italy has a very high incidence of celiac disease (intolerance to gluten found largely in wheat) and screens all their children before the age of 6. Can you imagine being an Italian where the culture is synonymous with pasta and having celiac disease? As our diets evolve with changes in knowledge, health, allergies, food distribution, politics, economy etc. new traditions and family memories will be created. It doesn't mean we won't grieve for those we have chosen not to continue. I wish you the best of luck with your upcoming diet changes and hope you will be able to find new and fun recipes to create with your dad (perhaps with the fish you catch together!).

      Delete
  2. Hi Pattie! Thanks for the comment. That makes perfect sense. There is a reason the term comfort food exists and is different for all of us based on our culture and experiences growing up. Italy has a very high incidence of celiac disease (intolerance to gluten found largely in wheat) and screens all their children before the age of 6. Can you imagine being an Italian where the culture is synonymous with pasta and having celiac disease? As our diets evolve with changes in knowledge, health, allergies, food distribution, politics, economy etc. new traditions and family memories will be created. It doesn't mean we won't grieve for those we have chosen not to continue. I wish you the best of luck with your upcoming diet changes and hope you will be able to find new and fun recipes to create with your dad (perhaps with the fish you catch together!).

    ReplyDelete